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that with a guest from "the washington post." he also plans to meet with local families in richmond, virginia, and iowa, to talk about the economy, and do some more campaigning here at home and washington. on friday, a ceremony for justice elena kagan that the supreme court. speaking of the supreme court's newest justice, "usa today" reports that she first is -- faces the first supreme court test today. where with no law clerks are sectors present, to decide which cases to take up later how they should be resolved. and a first of the private sessions for the new term, which officially begins october 4, they will slip through thousands of appeals filed over the summer to decide which should be job -- granted hearings. the conference room is where all of the most and poor decisions of the most and poor decisions are made and they are made by the nine justices and no one else -- the most important decisions are made and they are made by the nine justices and no one else. many justices speak about how intimidating the first sessions can be. in hawaii justice anthony kennedy says the first confere
understand the frustration of the senators from virginia and their inability to obtain a more complete rationale and plan for the pentagon's proposed actions. the secretaries in tend to reduce duplication, overhead, and excess in the department of defense is commendable, but his action should be supported by an open process, which includes detailed analysis and full consideration of opposing views. we again thank witnesses for their presence here this morning. we look forward to their testimony, and i call upon senator mccain. >> thank you. i thank the distinguished witnesses for being here this morning and their service to the nation. secretary gates announced a series of initiatives in august to improve the inefficiency of the department of defense. as part of this initiative, he also passed dr. carter to improve the department's buying power through a plate it acquires critical goods and services in order to stop runaway costs, growth, and program delays. we look forward to hearing from dr. carter of the initial procesprogress he is making. i'd in both these initiatives are coming a
tomorrow afternoon, heading from iowa to virginia." with a theme throughout the papers this morning, divided government. a response to the president's weekly radio address yesterday, "can the two parties work together in the next congress"? for republicans, 202-737-0001. for democrats, 202-737-0002. for independents, 202-628-0205. yesterday from "the washington post," based on a weekly radio address and internet address yesterday -- host: also this morning, "politics and policy." host: we will get your phone calls in a moment, but first year is the president yesterday in his weekly address. >> many of the republican leaders were amongst the architects of the failed policy. grounded in the same moral philosophy, cut the taxes for millionaires and billionaires, cut the rules for wall street, cut loose the middle class to fend for itself. that is the echo of a disastrous decade that we cannot afford to relive. host: paul pearson has this, "cough up in the middle. what is a president who do"? "had the president realized earlier that he never could have won over corporate america, he nev
, the previous generation. host: nelson from west virginia. if you are from generation x, or generation y, we want to hear from you, since you will be in europe in the world -- you will be inheriting the world from the baby boom generation. and those folks that came out of the world war ii years, if you would like to talk about the baby boomers and what you left them, that would be an interesting conversation as well. the next call is from wisconsin, ron on the democrats line. ron, what generation are you in? caller: high may boomer -- i'm a boomer, born in 1947 and i think the article is way off balance. i think the contribution of the boomers goes beyond any of the other generations in the fact that people nowadays can actually say no, instead of just marching in lockstep with what happened up until the 1960's. we could say, hey, wait a second, something is wrong, and to make changes. and these changes really shaped present generations. and i think if anything, the present generation are the ones that are released boyle, undereducated, and really do not have a direction. -- are really spoil
, there will be defined benefits. you could look at north carolina and norfolk south, virginia and csx. there are many other states where we don't have progress. irnl one or both of you want to terry briefly and then get back to my main interest which is captive shipper rates >> they really get lost in all of this. one of the things troubling is the massive use of stock repurchases. i think one would have to look at a balance you say, well, people have a right to reward their share holders. they are encouraged in people to invest. along with that is the whole question of capital shipments. that's really why we are here. i would like to hear from you, a sense of your path to fairness of the captive. shippers come to see me all the time. they come from all over the koirpt country. i'm not a lawyer but i feel like one when i think of all the cases brought before the itc or stb and feeling short changed. they are always up against you can win or loose because you have a system. you sort of discuss the release in some of these papers i am reading but it is a case of timing. the classic technique is to stal
you think -- host: next call is richmond, virginia. go ahead. caller: what does your guest think china's preference would be? what would china like to see happen? guest: they have been relatively quiet. they are hesitant to press north korea. they see that as an internal development. china's greater concern is north korea's behavior. they continue to play like north korea's lawyer in the u.n. council. they are trying to be on both sides of the fence at the same time. they are trying to say they are behaving as a responsibly stake holder at the same time, they undermine the affect of the u.n. sanctions to get north korea to abide by the sanctions and give up weapons. host: north texas on the republican line. caller: good morning. they had a nuclear test in some cave up north. are they really a nreally a power? guest: they did have an unsuccessful test but they have unsuccessful test but they have had a successful test. we know they are able to test a device. there's uncertainty to the degree to which they've weaponized. most don't think they have miniaturized any warhead so it wo
you look at those numbers in virginia, when you look at them in new jersey, when you look at them in, all states obama carried by his national average or better, you just do the math turning whiter. and i think the question for the future is that the people who are like the -- are the republicans if they get a majority in the house, if they get a strong bargaining position in the senate, are they prepared to advance and perhaps achieve public policies that are going to work as public policy and that are going to commit voter ovations in subsequent elections. i think that's an open question. if they of. it's field politics are not assured of success. i do think however that in more than any other time i've been following polics, voters are open to a vast cut back in the size and scope of government in a way that they haven't had in most past years. they are aware that the obama mocrats have hugely increased it. minority leader john peters called the other day to say let's go back to 2008 spending levels. it's actually at the intelligence staf in the right direction because most people
troops in afghanistan. virginia, the plan, democrats line. go ahead. caller: i am from new york. shall i speak up? host: go ahead. caller: i think he should turn the page. it should have been turned a long time ago. but i do not think the media will let him because they just keep the war is going. let me say this because i tried so hard to get on to you -- george washington's farewell address. he answered many of the questions facing us. telling us we should be aware -- host: sorry, we will have to let you go. your signal is breaking up. here's more from the president last night. >> we must use all elements of all power, including our diplomacy, economic strength, and the power of america as an example to secure our interests and stand by our allies. and we must reject a vision of the future that is based not just on our fearless but also on our hopes. division that recognizes the real dangers that exist around the world but also the limitless possibilities of our time. today, old adversaries are at peace and emerging democracies are potential partners. new markets for our goods stretch
the gentleman from virginia rise? >> to address the house for one minute. revise and extend. the speaker pro tempore: without objection, so ordered. mr. moran: mr. speaker, history is instructive on almost every issue we face in this body. today's issue is whether we should take action so that the wealthiest americans don't have to pay at an income tax rate of 39.6%. so let's look back at when they were taxed at that rate during the clinton administration. well, what happened was exactly the opposite of what the republican party predicted would happen. in fact, people at that rate brought home more after-tax income than any time in american history. 22 million new jobs were created and we had record budget surplusings. in fact, at the end -- surpluses. in fact, at the end of this month we were projected to have paid off all of the debt. relieving our children and grandchildren of any of the debt that we would have otherwise burdened them with. alan greenspan was worried we didn't have enough debt, but instead we had a president who came in and in fact one of the very first things he did was
, some people say, rode in on the obama wave. the virginia 5th district is conservative leaning and mccain won it with 50.6% of the vote. it is traditionally a republican stronghold and has become somewhat less so. and it is represented by a democrat. >> virginia's 5th district is the size of new jersey and it is a triangle shape with the sharltsville region, home to the university of virginia and thomas jefferson's home down to the south side of virginia, north carolina border that includes the city of martinsville, danville and part of lynchburg. the economy has hit the district hard. their unemployment tops 20%. it's bad, but not quite as bad as elsewhere in the district. there is unemployment continues to be a problem throughout the district. there have been a number of foreclosures, obviously like everywhere. people who have their jobs, their pay has stagnated for the last few years. so it's certainly a big problem here. tom perriello is a moderate democrat. whereas on some of the big ticket priorities on president obama and the democrats, he voted in favor of health care r
. virginia, go ahead. caller: hi. i wanted to speak on nancy pelosi in support of her voice for aiding the people. one of the things that i think that has happened is the republicans have controlled the message. however, at the end of the day when it comes time for them to stand forth for the voting, people are going to find out that the republicans are selling a product without instructions. and that is going to be detrimental to them and their message that they've been continuing to churn out. it's a marketing ploy. and it's a very good one at this moment, but i think when if educated population decides to actually tune back in and say let's get on the band wagon they're going to find out that the republicans have been selling poison to the people. host: so you're saying thingless change as we get close to november caller: absolutely. i don't necessarily believe in all polls. i do watch them. but i do believe that there is an issue right now with the people that they're calling. i don't think that every person's household has been called and i think they're targeting certain areas to
of virginia vargas, james madison, the pink anies of south carolina. charles cokes worth and challs, king of massachusetts, zander hamilton of new york. benjamin franklin and thomas, robert morris of pennsylvania. morris of pennsylvania. and william patterson of new jersey. some of the names we still remember in history of signing the constitution. next telephone call fro charlotte, north carolina. good morning on this constitution day as we ask you whether or not you believe in original meaning or the living document. ivan, democrat's line. caller: let's take the original intent and work with that. because that is where the disagreement is. the reason why there's even a debate is because what is the founding philosophy that governs the constitution is the acquisition of property. the central focus of the constitution is a concern over properties. what makes this such -- what makes or gives this the character of a living document or original intent is the idea of slave enrichment slavery has 10 pro vigs and the most engrossed element of the constitution. they were concerned about establis
and my father from southern virginia. and washington is where they met, married and then had me. so, without the great migration, i wouldn't be here. i don't know who you'd be talking to. so, i've lived with it all my life. i grew up with people from north carolina, south carolina, georgia -- all around me in the neighborhood where i grew up. and i was surrounded by the language, the food, the music, the ambitions, too, of the people who had migrated from the south. a lot of competition about who's child would go to which school, catholic school, the school across the park. so, it's been with me all this time. but i think that, when it comes to the actual writing of a book, it probably started, very likely, after i had gotten out and been a reporter for the "new york times" and started to talk to people in other parts of the country. i was chicago bureau chief for the "new york times." and i would go to chicago. i'd be in cleveland, i'd be in detroit. and i'd begin to hear that there were similar migration experiences that people had. no one talked about it as a migration experience
for a tuesday showdown when there will be republican opposition. west virginia, next. west virginia, next. caller: i think stephen colbert is an american and he has a right to say what he wants to say. that is how the man gets his views across. host: the fact that he is a celebrity -- caller: why shouldn't he? we say what we want to said. why can he say what he wants to say? host: people talked about his qualifications and talking about this issue. caller: that is how he gets what you want to say across. if you watch his show, which i do, him and jon stewart bring things to the forefront. they do it in a comical way. many people don't get it. we are all going to get a lot of field jaws because republicans are leading us down that path. there is such a gap between poor people and rich people is that we will need those jobs and fighting immigrants for those jobs if large class people don't wake up and vote. wake up and vote. host: new york , our republican line per caller: good morning. celebritiesk that should be in position to make comments all over the place. i believe that we are in thi
. the gentleman from new jersey. mr. pallone: i yield to my friend from virginia, mr. moran, for as much time as he may consume. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman is recognized. mr. moran: i thank my good friend from new jersey for yielding me the time as well as his friendship as well as the distinguished gentleman from kentucky, mr. whitfield. and i want to recognize mr. inslee for introducing this legislation. we share a deep concern about the use of medications which are not being safely returned to drugstores because of the regulatory difficulties and in many cases you have to have a police officer there overseeing the return of the drugs this will get over those restrictions and allow a process to happen which is terribly important because we should all know that drug abuse is not limited to street corner illegal drug purchases. that, in fact, the abuse of prescription drugs is a large part of america's drug problem. particularly among young people. one study has shown that in the last decade, nonmedical use of prescription drugs increased by almost 100%. among adolescents between
across the country. it ranges from two states, kentucky and virginia, which partly disenfranchises anyone with a felony conviction. you lose the right to vote for life in their states. you can apply for clemency and ask the governor to restore your rights. you have to go to an application procedure. it is entirely at his discretion. he decides it is to vote in his state. under some governors, that number drops precipitously. it is purely discretionary. it is entirely within the governor's control. the result is hundreds of thousands of people are disenfranchised in the states. that has a disproportionate impact on communities of color. we have been working with our partners at the naacp and the and say it -- and the aclu to change that. the results or that two states still disenfranchised anyone with a felony conviction. it will not surprise you that florida, alabama, mississippi, and arizona have permanent disenfranchisement are at least some people with criminal convictions. there has been -- i want to talk about it -- the introduction to our report. a number of these laws are firmly ro
and everything will trickle down. >> the candidates running in the virginia race are tom periello freshman democrat, elected in a wave of victories during obama's victory in 2008, and against him is challenger robert -- republican state senator from chatham, the seventh part of the district, and jeff parker, tea party member and independent businessman from the danville area. this race is getting a lot of national attention because republicans see periello as one of the most vulnerable democrats in congress, he represents a somewhat conservative district and he voted in favor of obama's major initiatives -- health care, capt. trade, stimulus, so on. and two years ago he was elected by the smallest margin of any congressional race in the country. they think -- the republicans are seeing this as a pickup but democrats, however, say tom perriello is a fighter, very tough campaigner and because he supported the same initiatives that he is getting support of national democrats just like national republicans are trying to taken down. in 2008, perriello, a young lawyer from charlottesville, he ch
on to virginia. republican line. good morning. caller: yes. we have where i live at we have three pen ten sharies here and there's over a thousand inmates there. and the state -- the tax people pay i hear anywhere from $16,000 to $25,000 a year. and that's not right for us to pay that kind of money for -- to how's those inmates. host: how many jobs do you think those three produce for that area? caller: very few. host: whether or not do you say that? caller: because it's a low income county and stuff. the only thing that keeps our county going is the coal mines and stuff. host: ok. did you have more to add? caller: i would just like, like i said, $25,000 that taxpayers pay to keep the inmate in jail. and just like i said, they need to get those inmates out and bring our soldiers back home from afghanistan and train those prisoners over there for two or three weeks and send them over there. host: according to the national public radio, in 2006 the it cost about $68 billion for corrections. the average cost per state inmate was $22,000 or about $62 per day among facilities operated by the federal b
with us today. they lived in west virginia. this military family loves the marine corps and counted a blessing to have live throughout the united states. as you know, general amos is held the title of assistant commandant for the marine corps for the past two years. today we consider his nomination to be commandant, to lead a force of 250,000 active duty and 39,000 reserve marines serving on the frontiers of freedom, fighting in afghanistan, providing humanitarian relief to flood-ravaged pakistan, and practices -- rescuing vessels from pirates off the coast of somalia. join in 19 -- one in a 1946, his father received his wings flying seaplanes. eupepsia most distinguished officer before you here today. i will have you noted growing up with a father who was a navy pilot saw general amos living in memory -- many warm localities, california, florida, and the british west indies. his guidance counselor once wrote his parents that he feared that the general was "destined for a light as a beach bum if he did not turn things around." obviously he did turn things around. he graduated in hig
and like the gentleman in west virginia. that would be negative. the gentleman in kentucky that is not here visiting, the democrats do not have to pray that it will be 1994 and more because it will be more of the depression we were headed for. was it enough? host: can i ask you, how is the senate race looking in pennsylvania? at the plant to vote? caller: i think the republicans are in for a big surprise. the callers wanted to know why your show lanes towards the democrats. it does not. i think it is buried there. you do not have republicans calling in. i think there are some republicans out there like myself. we have seen what they had done to this country. eight years was enough. host: the financial times says the attention is turning to al mr. obama will turn towards divided government. the parallel is when it did gingrich seized control. his party had been in the minority for the previous four years and over reached. he deprived the government of day today funding. the public blamed the republicans for the shutdown. the president regained the initiative and was reelected one year later.
lieutenant in the u.s. army in 1902, following his graduation from the virginia military institute. he quickly rose through the ranks and was appointed chief of staff of the army in 1939 by president frankly roosevelt. marshall inherited an army on the cusp of a second world war and oversaw the largest military expansion in u.s. history. in 1944, he became the first american general to be promoted to a five-star rank. the newly created general of the army. marshall resigned his post of chief of staff of the army in 1945 and devoted himself to international security and peace. between 1945 and 1946 he served as the envoy for president truman in china to peacefully resolve a conflict between the nationalists and the communists. president truman appointed him as secretary of state in 1947 where he oversaw the marshall plan, the $13 billion economic recovery plan that was instrumental in the rebuilding of europe. for his efforts, marshall seen the nobel peace prize. he retired from the state department in 1949 and became the president of the american red cross. in 1950 president truman app
, 2001. the speaker: the unfinished business is the vote on the motion of the gentleman from virginia, mr. connolly, to suspend the rules and agree to h.r. 1610, in which the yeas and nays are ordered. the clerk will report the title of the resolution. the clerk: house resolution 1610, resolution expressing the sense of the house of representatives regarding the terrorist attacks launched against the united states on september 11, 2001. the speaker: without objection, five-minute voting will continue. the question is will the house suspend the rules and agree to the resolution. members will record their votes by electronic device. this is a five-minute vote. [captioning made possible by the national captioning institute, inc., in cooperation with the united states house of representatives. any use of the closed-captioned coverage of the house proceedings for political or commercial purposes is expressly prohibited by the u.s. house of representatives.] the speaker pro tempore: on this vote the yeas are 410, the nays are zero. 2/3 having responded in the affirmative, the rule is suspended,
in illinois, west virginia and delaware will take office more or less immediately after votes are canvased and certified and they'll be serving in the lame-duck session. i believe that voters in those states will render a very clear judgment on this lame duck agenda by sending additional reinforcements for our side of the aisle. the campaign strategy of our friends on the other side of the aisle is crystal clear. they are not running on their legislative accomplishments because it's largely unpopular. and they are worried that voters will hold them accountable for the failure of those policies to meet their own stated goals. so they're running campaigns against the american people, some of whom are participating in the political process for the first time. and i'm talking about the tea party movement. calling some of these participants in the process guaranteed by the first amendment of the constitution to redress their government on their grievances and they're deemonizing members of the tea party -- demonizing members of the tea party movement. and president obama has engaged in class wa
is something that we have to debate about, but i do not believe in sanctuaries. host: alexandria, virginia. oscar, democratic line. caller: i just came to the united states. i am a legal resident now. before people talk about the eagles not paying taxes -- talk about illegals not paying taxes , we do not steal the numbers, we just invent them. in my case i work for seven years with a fake number that they took. for seven years i have worked, i will never get the money with my three jobs and we do pay taxes. inform yourself. you will understand that most undocumented people do pay taxes. make sure that the criminals do not get any identification in your passage of this law. the people that have worked really hard to put food on the table for their families, but they wanted an opportunity. forgive them. those k -- host: ok. congressman? guest: becoming a naturalized citizen, i understand what he is saying. but what you are saying validates what i have been saying. looking as social security, the last numbers i saw were over $4 billion there, people like yourselves that i put money in and pro
, provided as a public service. >> president obama today went to falls church, virginia, to hear from a group of americans who have benefited from the health- care law past six months ago. several provisions take effect today, including a ban on lifetime coverage limits. this is 50 minutes. >> hello, good to see you guys. how are you? everybody, have a seat. i know it is warm out here. what's your name? thank you for coming. >> how are you? >> thank you so much. >> welcome. we would like to welcome you to our backyard. we appreciate you all being here. we try to clean up everything, but watch your step. 36 years ago i was born with hemophilia. i like a specific clotting factor in my blood -- lack a specific clotting factor in my blood. it has been that challenge over the years. 2006 are reached a lifetime cap after three years. i was trying to figure out what to do, whether i should go on a disability policy, change jobs, and new states. fortunately my employer came through and was able to cover my health care costs, but it was a significant stress for me and my wife. we had an opportunity to
. alexandria, virginia. democrats line. you are on. go ahead, please. ellis, speak up or we have to move on. caller: i am speaking up. host: what do you have to say? caller: nobody should be too big to fail. host: de have anything more to add? caller: the reason i think these people should be allowed to fail is because already the government has already bailed them out. and at this point, we are still working on bailing them out, yet they don't seem to be helping anybody else out here in this economy right now. and they are actively lobbying right now in congress to try to get to -- republicans get back to office. part of this deal. it is all partisan. and it is all about politics. and what is going to come down to in the end is they say they don't want it to be failing -- ok, the republicans don't, but yet the democrats are saying they are trying to restrict this now so nobody can be too big to fail. and what we will end up is these big companies are going to get their money back, they will all buy into their way and they will -- obviously what we are looking at, where we were before. then
that is from tuesday. virginia. brian, republican. go ahead. caller: first-time caller. i would like to comment a little bit about congress. i have listened to a couple of the comments made this morning. the problem we have right now is that republicans and democrats cannot get together on any issue that we have relating to this country. it is a shame that they can't do that. and i think that this health care reform that they have passed, that the democrats have passed, has really affected our country and has affected me also as a citizen. it because i am a police officer. -- because i am a police officer, and just this year alone might premiums, ever since they passed the health care plan, my premiums have gone up twice. actually talking about going up again in -- where it. costs -- going up begin in january. this is the biggest reason premiums i have never had and i have been a lot enforcement 22 years. it's, you work for the city? is it -- host: do you work for the city? is it the city paying less or the premiums going up to the cause has increased to both? caller: well, the blue cross and b
. this is wre democrats did well in the last two cycles. we saw this in northern virginia, suburbs outside philadelphia, outside of las vegas and phoenix, even, this is where democrats we able to win over voters with a common sense kind of agenda, practic approach to making the middle- class better. what we found is a lot of residents there are falling on tough times and switching their loyalties. they are not necessarily tea party people, so they are not angry -- i talked to about two dozen residents of the subdivision who were political independents, and they did not say anything hateful about the president or that they were voting the tea party but they were critical of the president. it's good he said they were not tea party identifiers. -- host: yu said that they are concerned about everyday issues that affect their lives. how important of the suburbs or this area of this country -- not urban america or rural america, more of a middle-class enclave. guest: it is critical for both parties. it is where the growth is. not necessarily the closed in suburbs that have been established for a
we got here. james madison when he was still in virginia he wanted to have -- they really understood that the articles of confederation weren't working in this country. there was a dispute going on and they wanted to get something worked out with maryland and they sat down and came up with an idea of having some kind of get together and meeting in philadelphia. the question arose at that time when they going to a, look at the articles of confederation and try to amend those. that's what a lot of delegates that attended thought they were doing. or as madison thought, we are going to sit down and bring forth a great new document that would get us past that trying time in our country's history and move us forward. there's great debate because in 1787 in may of that year, and as members were coming in the delegates were coming in from around the country, the 13 states, we shouldn't be doing this or shouldn't be doing that because we are only supposed to be here for the articles of confederation, but folks started sitting down and looking at the issue. as they were looking at this, more a
island, did not ratify the document until after the country was established. but five states, virginia, massachusetts, new york, maryland and south carolina sent specific amendments that should be added to the document. foremost in each of those states' amendments was the concept of sovereignty or the ability of states to make the decisions. their goal and their concepts were incorporated in the 10th amendment to the constitution which put in written form the unnamed structure that the founding fathers had established in the constitution. as one of our justices on the supreme court said, the constitution protects us from our own best intentions. it divides power among branches of government precisely so we may resist the temptation to concentrate power in one location as the expedient solution to the crisis of the day. for a century and a half, this nation basically honored that concept. in the last half century, though, we have stretched the idea significantly. starting with the progressive era in the early 1900's'. it was president wilson who called this political witch craft. he sai
to do that? i do not know that we do. host: rob on the republican line. arlington, virginia. caller: i want to start with a brief note of fairness for this sitting president, president barack obama. he did say afghanistan was the good war, he did say that on the campaign trail. for him to receive criticism about going back on a promise is wrong. he said he wanted to leave iraq and to work in afghanistan, which is what he is doing. as i see it, one of the few promis he kept. there were a lot of attacks since president obama became president in the green zone. there were eighin the month of june or something and the media has remained silent on that. if george bush were still president, they would be airing not constantly. it would be on all the front pages across the country. when you see an uptick of violence in the green zone, it may not be a good time to pull aout. it seems like amateur hour here. you could take all of the money spent, look at all the projects that have been completed -- massive amount of projects -- add it all up and it is about $35 billion. this is straight from th
: richmond, virginia, 35 years old. go ahead. go ahead. caller: yes . i am 35 and i work with -- i have been voting since clinton, i think, came in. i think that young people are not as informed as they used the. -- as they used to be. even older than i am, there were civics.in school about si guest: civics education in our schools has been systematically cut over the last 30 years. but that is not so you can blame young people about. that is an issue of where we investing resources, where are we investing in the young people? we have a program called democracy class that is available to teachers around the country, if they want a one- classroom curriculum. it should be significantly more than that. but young people are savvy. they are paying attention. we see they are following the news closely than they have in many years. i think that is what is causing some of the cynicism. they are starting to pay attention. they see that their interests are being cut by others or by corporate or special interests at times. they are savvy right now, especially with the internet, to actually find out inf
: virginia beach, mark, independent line. caller: i am starting to get involved in politics and things like that i am finding it hard to comprehend because you're saying you cannot talk reveal private investments that you are getting of millions and millions of dollars, but again, you owe so much money and [unintelligible] and the federal government goes and punishes because they've made their money probably and kept it to themselves. where are you getting all of this money from? host: michael, we've got your point. let me show the viewers the headline in "usa today." ehab line is that mid debt -- midterm campaign war chests are crammed. guest: we were looking at a billion dollars election cycle back in march and that was kind of a trajectory of spending in the elections of a last several cycles, not taking into account the fact that the recent decision could unleash a far more money in the election cycle. we were looking at a baseline spending, which would still be 30% above the previous midterm with the success by the candidates and these interest groups. i think the press will be far hig
first call comes from richmond, virginia. randy on our line for republicans. caller: i have a question -- or a common. -- comment. i wanted to give you a personal compliments on your last segment. you were very professional -- not just cracking of about the planets alignments on september 50. host: thank you a lot. thank you for your questions or comments. caller: i saw on msnbc about the secretary of labor was talking about the large portion of money being invested in this high tech training. doing some investments there. i work in a very high tech field and i have been unemployed for over eight months. i have plenty of security. my question is, how do you think that will trace how those funds will help of the lower income, or as you were saying, just high-school educated person in the workforce? i believe it would be a good step, but it will not help anything in the here and now to get any kind of education in the high-tech industry -- you at least need a four-year degree. guest: that is true. if you are looking in the high- tech industry in particular, most of those jobs to require
fundraising dinner. the former chairman of virginia's democratic party writes about her this morning in "the washington post," says sarah palin saved the g.o.p. here how he concludes -- palin started as tonto, but became the lone ranger. she runs mains strong and stood by her party. she's become a bridge between the old republican guard and the growing right-wing dissatisfaction, not just about democrats, but also with republican office holders. palin's ability to advocate for using the g.o.p., not a third party to channel this angst has allowed republican voter anger to boil, yet not boil over. should republicans run up the score in november, sarah palin will deserve a lot of credit she will never get. guest: i don't know whether she'll get it, but i think that's a very accurate assessment. i think palin has been great. she's been a dynamo. she has advocated for conservative principles unapologetically. when they tried to beat her down, she bounces right back, and she's right back in her faces, and she set an example. and really, do you realize what it's like to have the entire media machin
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